Wednesday, August 5, 2009

Camille Przewodek - Plein Air Colorist


Camille Przewodek studied with Henry Hensche, who taught the Impressionist use of color, that "every plane change is a color change." Instead of the old masters' way of creating an image by drawing, using perspective and shading and then using glazes to suggest color, Impressionism looks only at the way colors interact with each other and with light to create the shapes and perspective that we see. Painting plein air is the only way to learn to use color in this way, and mixing colors directly on the panel instead of on the palette is the only way to see them in context as you work. Camille blocks in the basic shapes, making sure to have the color notes correct before adding details. Using a palette knife also helps in keeping the colors true and avoiding too much detail.

4 comments:

Michael Chesley Johnson said...

I've always loved Camille's work. Thanks for sharing!

Judsons Art Outfitters said...

Thanks, Michael! Sometimes people don't realize how much careful observation (and careful brushwork/knifework) goes into seemingly spontaneous paintings such as hers.

Robin Roberts said...

that's the best, most concise explanation of that way of seeing I've come across. And of course, Camille's work is just yummy.

Judsons Art Outfitters said...

Thanks for commenting, Robin.
Very nice blog!